Is Science Fiction/Fantasy discriminatory? Yes, the industry seems to think so…

Q: "So, why do you write these strong female characters?" A: "Because you're still asking me that question." - Joss Whedon.

Q: “So, why do you write these strong female characters?”
A: “Because you’re still asking me that question.” – Joss Whedon.

I don’t normally dodge too far outside my own writing and musings on my writing on this blog, but this article in The Guardian brings up something that bugs me: there is this idea that science fiction and fantasy is the realm of straight white men and somehow discriminates against those who are not in that demographic.   From the article:

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Transitions, Part IV: An Erik McKetten Tale (1,505 words)

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Inside the 300-series cockpit.  (c) 2012/2013 CIG.

Inside the 300-series cockpit. (c) 2012/2013 CIG.

Transitions, Part IV: An Erik McKetten Tale

Cat turned and sat in the pilot’s chair. The leather groaned in protest, reluctantly submitting to the weight of a pilot for the first time in decades. Cat waited, expecting the chair to rotate and face the controls. Nothing happened. Signy really was lifeless. Only the most basic of functions worked – the secondary systems powered up to open the cargo doors and turn on the lights and life support. Everything else seemed frozen in time.

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Transitions, Part III: An Erik McKetten Tale (1,603 words)

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Concept Art: UEE Bengal Class Carrier and Escorts in orbit (c) 2012/2013 CIG

Concept Art: UEE Bengal Class Carrier and Escorts in orbit (c) 2012/2013 CIG

Transitions, Part III: An Erik McKetten Tale

Cat used his MobiGlas to contact the ship’s computer. She was in sleep mode, powered down and surviving off the umbilical connected to the hangar’s power supply, but the computer recognized his tags and opened the basic functions. The screen lit up with a schematic of the ship. He touched the canopy. Nothing happened. He frowned. The mechanic warned him they thought Signy’s computer was faulty, but she let him access her lower functions, so why couldn’t he get at the higher ones?

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Transitions, Part II: An Erik McKetten Tale (1,861 words)

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Origin Jumpworks 300 Series Advertisement (c) 2012/2013 CIG

Origin Jumpworks 300 Series Advertisement (c) 2012/2013 CIG

Transitions, Part II: An Erik McKetten Tale

The sickly light of Jord’s winter sun behind the Origin Jumpworks 315p cast a soft shadow on the boy. The ship was beautiful; it was Pappa’s pride and joy. When Pappa wasn’t working for the Jarl, or out viking with his Thingmen, he was working on the ship or flying it. To the boy, the ship was a construction of magic and wonder. Her sleek lines, shiny and smooth, stood in stark contrast to the typical Drake and MISC workhorses employed by BSVC.

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